The Unremarkable Murder in Fox Chase

I’d like to introduce you to a murder. There’s nothing particularly heinous about it, and apparently, it doesn’t even stand out to officials enough to update the public on the status of the case.

I’d like to take you back to my hometown of Shepherdsville, Kentucky again. Within this suburb of Louisville, there are nice areas and there are working class areas. There are farms and there are subdivisions. I grew up in a subdivision. Fox Chase is considered a 6th class city because it has 999 residents or less; (447 as of 2010, and nearly all of them are white). In the pre-antebellum era, the land belonged to the Rogers who ran a plantation. Lillian Chase, the great granddaughter of the original plantation owner, sold it to developers in the 70s. Fox Chase was born a couple years later and flourished in the 80s with cape cods and ranches and split levels. No one there lives below the poverty line. My own family moved out of the neighborhood and across town in 2001.

Fox Chase, KY

Entrance to Fox Chase, KY where I grew up.

I’ve set the scene for you. You already know that murders in Bullitt County are few and far between. Residents of Fox Chase know each other, and they wave when they see you. People don’t just get shot in Fox Chase. But that’s exactly what happened to 55-year old Donald Ash in January of 2009. And the weirdest part? His 2005 Lexus was missing from the scene.

1) Why hasn’t the police department updated the public on the status of this case? If they have, I can find no record of it online.

2) Cars don’t just disappear. Yes, they get stolen, hidden, and scrapped, but has this Lexus really not shown up in six years? Was anyone ever even looking for it?

3) Motive, anyone?

It is interesting to note that the police chief of Pioneer Village was the rookie cop I told you about in the Jessica Dishon case. The last communication I have from him to the public on the case simply says they are “making progress”. That was reported on January 16, 2009.

All I can glean about Mr. Ash from the news coverage is that he was apparently the kind of guy who didn’t wave back when his neighbors passed. Also, he had been a technician at AT&T for 30 years and was also running a small business out of his home when he was killed.

Just for creep factor’s sake, I want to show you the house I grew up in. And then I want to show you Mr. Ash’s. My childhood home is marked by the yellow dot in the bottom right hand side of the picture, just a 3 minute leisurely walk to the murder scene. I can’t remember if even numbers were on the left or the right on his street, but Mr. Ash’s house is either the one marked by the red dot or the one across from it.

Map measuring the distance from my childhood home to the crime scene where Donald Ash, 55, was found shot and killed in his home in January of 2009.

Map measuring the distance from my childhood home to the crime scene where Donald Ash, 55, was found shot and killed in his home in January of 2009.

The murder itself is unremarkable, at least insofar as it comes to murders. He was shot and found a day or so later. The police haven’t said much of anything, and the only thing of value they reported missing was Mr. Ash’s Lexus. But when you grow up down the street from a house that later becomes the scene of a murder, it’s a little unnerving.

Shit like that doesn’t go down in Bullitt County often. The fact that it happened in Fox Chase is unnerving to say the least.

Sources:

  1. http://www.bullittcountyhistory.com/cem/unnamed_cem_fox_chase.html
  2. http://www.cityoffoxchase.org/demographics/
  3. http://www.wlky.com/Police-Investigate-Potential-Link-Between-Slayings/9816524
  4. http://www.wdrb.com/story/9649515/55-year-old-man-found-dead-in-bullitt-county-home

Meet Your Crime Historian.

Here we go! It’s the beginning of the #31days challenge. I have a special group of online friends that introduced me to this challenge, and I’m so excited to partake in it! Every day throughout the month of October, I will post about a specific crime that fascinates me. I will always do my best to respect the victims in each situation, and I will strive to stay considerate as much as possible. However, sometimes the gruesome details just can’t be left out. If that bothers you, find a light-hearted read elsewhere. This will be heavy.

 A few things about me.

1) I have been blogging since way back when they still called it by its original term–‘weblogging’ This is the part where you call me a hipster and I pretend to be offended but secretly revel in the label.

2) I struggle with consistency in blogging, so this challenge is going to kick my tail into gear and get me writing about a topic that fascinates me.

3) I am sort of obsessed with crime. I interject stories of crimes into casual conversations, and apparently this freaks people out. Even though I’m working on a Master’s in Education, I have 30 hours of undergrad criminal justice classes under my belt. I am intrigued by criminal theory, specifically victim precipitation and delinquency theories.

Let’s do this,

The Crime Historian